All posts by Tim Hoiland
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The Scarlet Cord – An Update..

September 24, 2015 No Comments 1

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the reactions of people as they experienced the exhibit. A short film about the installation opened last week at the Grand Rapids Public Museum in Michigan, as reported by mlive.com. You can learn more about Pamela Alderman and "The Scarlet Cord" here. The trailer for the film is...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the reactions of people as they experienced the exhibit. A short film about the installation opened last week at the Grand Rapids Public Museum in Michigan, as reported by mlive.com. You can learn more about Pamela Alderman and "The Scarlet Cord" here. The trailer for the film is...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the reactions of people as they experienced the exhibit. A short film about the installation opened last week at the Grand Rapids Public Museum in Michigan, as reported by mlive.com. You can learn more about Pamela Alderman and "The Scarlet Cord" here. The trailer for the film is...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord."...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the reactions of people as they experienced the exhibit. A short film about the installation opened last week at the Grand Rapids Public Museum in Michigan, as reported by mlive.com. You can learn more about Pamela Alderman and "The Scarlet Cord" here. The trailer for the film is...

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Community Transformation in Guadalupe..

August 11, 2015 No Comments 2

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with Marina Gonzales, a local leader in Guadalupe who runs the Guadalupe Learning Lab at El Mercado de Guadalupe. The learning lab's fall program begins this week. Flourish Phoenix: How do you see the work of the Guadalupe Learning Lab becoming more and more community owned? Marina Gonzales: When we started, parents would just drop off their kids. Sometimes, not even that. If they saw my car in the parking lot they knew I was here so they’d just drop them off outside and the kids would run in. Now, the parents walk their kids in here. They stop and talk for a little bit. We recently had an end-of-the-summer party and all the parents were here, cooking food, bringing snacks. They want to be here to see what their kids have been doing. Some of the parents are also helping to transport the kids when we have field trips, and they’re paying for them to go. And they’re willing to do it. When they come with us to places like Skateland or the museum, they don’t just drop us off – they stay the whole time. All of this means they’re interacting a lot more with our program. guadalupelab1 FP: What do you think is the biggest way this work is benefiting Guadalupe? MG: The biggest thing is helping our kids get through school, getting them the education they need. When they get older they’ll need that education. Without it, they’re going to have a hard life. Less than half...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with Marina Gonzales, a local leader in Guadalupe who runs the Guadalupe Learning Lab at El Mercado de Guadalupe. The learning lab's fall program begins this week. Flourish Phoenix: How do you see the work of the Guadalupe Learning Lab becoming more and more community owned? Marina Gonzales: When we started, parents would just drop off their kids. Sometimes, not even that. If they saw my car in the parking lot they knew I was here so they’d just drop them off outside and the kids would run in. Now, the parents walk their kids in here. They stop and talk for a little bit. We recently had an end-of-the-summer party and all the parents were here, cooking food, bringing snacks. They want to be here to see what their kids have been doing. Some of the parents are also helping to transport the kids when we have field trips, and they’re paying for...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with Marina Gonzales, a local leader in Guadalupe who runs the Guadalupe Learning Lab at El Mercado de Guadalupe. The learning lab's fall program begins this week. Flourish Phoenix: How do you see the work of the Guadalupe Learning Lab becoming more and more community owned? Marina Gonzales: When we started, parents would...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with Marina Gonzales, a local leader in Guadalupe who runs the Guadalupe Learning Lab at El Mercado de Guadalupe. The learning lab's fall program begins this week. Flourish Phoenix: How do you see the work of the Guadalupe Learning Lab becoming more and more community owned? Marina Gonzales: When we started, parents would...

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Praying for Reconciliation and Peace..

May 6, 2015 No Comments 3

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response, members of the clergy here in metro Phoenix have organized prayer rallies calling for racial justice and reconciliation through Faith & Justice PHX. At Flourish Phoenix, we’ve published multiple pieces by thoughtful leaders who are grappling with the implications of racial injustices, and we're committed to publishing additional perspectives on the issue (we’re waiting to hear from you!). In the meantime, we want you to know about the first annual Law Enforcement Prayer Breakfast coming up on May 20. Pastor José González, who leads a local network of Latino pastors, is organizing this event, with proceeds going to the 100 Club of Arizona. Gov. Doug Ducey is scheduled to speak, along with Attorney General Mark Brnovich and Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery. We spoke with Pastor González about his hopes for the event and his views on the need for reconciliation in our community. FP: In addition to your work as a hospice chaplain, you lead Arizona Christian Link. Could you briefly tell us what that is? JG: Arizona Christian Link is an organization that is helping to connect Latino churches with Anglo churches and African American churches, but also with government agencies and other institutions in our community. FP: In light of the recent tensions between police officers and minority communities, how do you see this event as a step towards reconciliation in our own city? JG: I believe there is a tendency to show the bad side of law enforcement officers. When we see one bad cop, it makes us believe that all cops are the same....

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response, members of the clergy here in metro Phoenix have organized prayer rallies calling for racial justice and reconciliation through Faith & Justice PHX. At Flourish Phoenix, we’ve published multiple pieces by thoughtful leaders who are grappling with the implications of racial injustices, and we're committed to publishing additional perspectives on the issue (we’re waiting to hear from you!). In the meantime, we want you to know about the first annual Law Enforcement Prayer Breakfast coming up on May 20. Pastor José González, who leads a local network of Latino pastors, is organizing this event, with proceeds going to the 100 Club of Arizona. Gov. Doug Ducey is scheduled to speak, along with Attorney General Mark Brnovich and Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery. We spoke with Pastor González about his hopes for the event and his views on the need for reconciliation in our community. FP: In addition to your work as a hospice chaplain, you lead...

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response, members of the clergy here in metro Phoenix have organized prayer rallies calling for racial justice and reconciliation through Faith & Justice PHX. At Flourish Phoenix, we’ve published multiple pieces by thoughtful leaders who are grappling with the implications of racial injustices, and we're committed to publishing additional perspectives on the...

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response,...

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities...

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response, members of the clergy here in metro Phoenix have organized prayer rallies calling for racial justice and reconciliation through Faith & Justice PHX. At Flourish Phoenix, we’ve published multiple pieces by thoughtful leaders who are grappling with the implications of racial injustices, and we're committed to publishing additional perspectives on the...

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The Pinewood Classic..

April 18, 2015 No Comments 4

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the Flourish Phoenix logo. He does great work.) FP: Where in the world did the idea for this event come from? DP: A few years back I took a trip back to my hometown of Virginia Beach. Around the same time, my dad was building a pinewood derby car with my younger brother. We had done the same thing years before when I was a boy scout, but this time it was a lot different. Dad proceeded to show me the precision machined wheels he’d purchased off the “cub scout black market,” and right down to the millimeter where to place his aftermarket tungsten weights. He had a laundry list of NASA-certified methods, guaranteed to win the pinewood derby. And he did. He and my brother went to state finals several years running. When I was younger, the full extent was, “I want mine to look like a steam engine!” And that was that. No bells, no whistles. It made me want to build a pinewood derby car more than ever. I just needed a reason. pinewood4 I had been part of planning Pedal Craft’s second and third events here in Phoenix, and knew just enough about throwing this type of party to be dangerous. During the last Pedal Craft event at Monorchid, I blurted out my idea to Brad Moore of Short Leash Hot Dogs. Before I had finished my sentence he offered to host it at their restaurant. Brad and Kat have really championed The Pinewood...

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the Flourish Phoenix logo. He does great work.) FP: Where in the world did the idea for this event come from? DP: A few years back I took a trip back to my hometown of Virginia Beach. Around the same time, my dad was building a pinewood derby car with my younger brother. We had done the same thing years before when I was a boy scout, but this time it was a lot different. Dad proceeded to show me the precision machined wheels he’d purchased off the “cub scout black market,” and right down to the millimeter where to place his aftermarket tungsten weights. He had a laundry list of NASA-certified methods, guaranteed to win the pinewood derby. And he did. He and my brother went to state finals several years running. When I was younger, the full extent was, “I want mine to look like a steam engine!” And that was...

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the Flourish Phoenix logo. He does great work.) FP: Where in the world did the idea for this event come from? DP: A few years back I took a trip back to my hometown of Virginia Beach. Around the same time, my dad was building a pinewood derby car with my younger brother....

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the...

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are...

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the Flourish Phoenix logo. He does great work.) FP: Where in the world did the idea for this event come from? DP: A few years back I took a trip back to my hometown of Virginia Beach. Around the same time, my dad was building a pinewood derby car with my younger brother....

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HopeFest Returns for the Fourth Year..

April 9, 2015 No Comments 7

HopeFest is returning to Chase Field on April 18. The annual event, which is coordinated by CityServe Arizona, connects our city’s “uninsured, underinsured and underserved” residents with a variety of resources and services they need. I spoke with Terrilyn Miller, the director of CityServe, about the upcoming event. FP: This will be the fourth time CityServe has sponsored HopeFest in Phoenix. Tell us how this annual event got started. TM: Billy Thrall, our founder, tells the story how he heard about HopeFest Tucson and wondered why we didn’t have anything like it in Phoenix. Soon after launching CityServe Arizona in April 2011, Lisa Chastain, the Founder and Executive Director of Hope Network (which puts on a HopeFest in Tucson each October), coached us through the initial stages of starting a HopeFest Phoenix. Several of us toured the Tucson event in October 2011 to see what it was like. We then took the idea and made adjustments to fit the needs here locally. For instance, Tucson had a homeless population focus and we wanted to focus on families that had been hit hard by the economic downturn and had no idea where to go for help. It was a leap of faith, but we held our first annual event in April 2012 – and it far exceeded our wildest dreams. FP: For the past few years, the Arizona Diamondbacks have hosted HopeFest at Chase Field, and it's a real bridge-building event, bringing together a diverse range of partner organizations. Talk about the links CityServe AZ has been able to develop between nonprofits, businesses, and government through this event over the years. TM: I cannot even begin to list all the partnerships! There are students and faculty from middle school to graduate school who participate in HopeFest. ASU has student groups such as the Council of Religious...

HopeFest is returning to Chase Field on April 18. The annual event, which is coordinated by CityServe Arizona, connects our city’s “uninsured, underinsured and underserved” residents with a variety of resources and services they need. I spoke with Terrilyn Miller, the director of CityServe, about the upcoming event. FP: This will be the fourth time CityServe has sponsored HopeFest in Phoenix. Tell us how this annual event got started. TM: Billy Thrall, our founder, tells the story how he heard about HopeFest Tucson and wondered why we didn’t have anything like it in Phoenix. Soon after launching CityServe Arizona in April 2011, Lisa Chastain, the Founder and Executive Director of Hope Network (which puts on a HopeFest in Tucson each October), coached us through the initial stages of starting a HopeFest Phoenix. Several of us toured the Tucson event in October 2011 to see what it was like. We then took the idea and made adjustments to fit the needs here locally. For instance, Tucson had a homeless population focus and we wanted to focus on families that had been hit hard by the economic downturn and had no idea where to go for help. It was a leap of faith, but we...

HopeFest is returning to Chase Field on April 18. The annual event, which is coordinated by CityServe Arizona, connects our city’s “uninsured, underinsured and underserved” residents with a variety of resources and services they need. I spoke with Terrilyn Miller, the director of CityServe, about the upcoming event. FP: This will be the fourth time CityServe has sponsored HopeFest in Phoenix. Tell us how this annual event got started. TM: Billy Thrall, our founder, tells the story how he heard about HopeFest Tucson and wondered why we didn’t have anything like it in Phoenix. Soon after launching CityServe Arizona in April 2011,...

HopeFest is returning to Chase Field on April 18. The annual event, which is coordinated by CityServe Arizona, connects our city’s “uninsured, underinsured and underserved” residents with a variety of resources and services they need. I spoke with Terrilyn Miller, the director of CityServe, about the upcoming event. FP: This will...

HopeFest is returning to Chase Field on April 18. The annual event, which is coordinated by CityServe Arizona, connects our city’s “uninsured, underinsured and underserved”...

HopeFest is returning to Chase Field on April 18. The annual event, which is coordinated by CityServe Arizona, connects our city’s “uninsured, underinsured and underserved” residents with a variety of resources and services they need. I spoke with Terrilyn Miller, the director of CityServe, about the upcoming event. FP: This will be the fourth time CityServe has sponsored HopeFest in Phoenix. Tell us how this annual event got started. TM: Billy Thrall, our founder, tells the story how he heard about HopeFest Tucson and wondered why we didn’t have anything like it in Phoenix. Soon after launching CityServe Arizona in April 2011,...

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Unleashing the Entrepreneurial Spirit..

March 24, 2015 No Comments 5

If you stop by Arizona Center (400 E Van Buren St) this Saturday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., right away you’ll notice that something unusual is happening. You’ll find 50 booths with over 100 entrepreneurs – none older than 14 years old – plying their wares. I interviewed event organizer Scott Donnell about the Arizona Children’s Business Fair and what it means for the future of our city. FP: Why should kids care about entrepreneurship? And why should we care that kids care about it? SD: Entrepreneurship is the lifeblood of the marketplace, and it can be the most freeing job in the world. Why? Because it allows people to use their best gifts and talents to the fullest, and the last person to fire you is you. I believe that kids are really pretty brilliant creators if we just give them the space to do it. Business is easy – make something with your hands that others want, and sell it to them safely for more than it cost you to make it. Kids get that pretty quickly. It is amazing to see them sell something for the first time that they made themselves – that is the spark we are trying to get to. That unleashes a kid – no more fear of getting a job, no more chores, no more boring. Every kid is on a hero's journey, and their calling is to find where their skills, passions, and needs of the world meet. That's why we should care that kids get these chances to be creators. My first business was in second grade, making bead-gecko keychains for $2, and I hired all my friends to make them for me. We sold hundreds of them until the teacher took away our beads because no one was doing work....

If you stop by Arizona Center (400 E Van Buren St) this Saturday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., right away you’ll notice that something unusual is happening. You’ll find 50 booths with over 100 entrepreneurs – none older than 14 years old – plying their wares. I interviewed event organizer Scott Donnell about the Arizona Children’s Business Fair and what it means for the future of our city. FP: Why should kids care about entrepreneurship? And why should we care that kids care about it? SD: Entrepreneurship is the lifeblood of the marketplace, and it can be the most freeing job in the world. Why? Because it allows people to use their best gifts and talents to the fullest, and the last person to fire you is you. I believe that kids are really pretty brilliant creators if we just give them the space to do it. Business is easy – make something with your hands that others want, and sell it to them safely for more than it cost you to make it. Kids get that pretty quickly. It is amazing to see them sell something for the first time that they made themselves – that is the spark...

If you stop by Arizona Center (400 E Van Buren St) this Saturday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., right away you’ll notice that something unusual is happening. You’ll find 50 booths with over 100 entrepreneurs – none older than 14 years old – plying their wares. I interviewed event organizer Scott Donnell about the Arizona Children’s Business Fair and what it means for the future of our city. FP: Why should kids care about entrepreneurship? And why should we care that kids care about it? SD: Entrepreneurship is the lifeblood of the marketplace, and it can be the most freeing...

If you stop by Arizona Center (400 E Van Buren St) this Saturday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., right away you’ll notice that something unusual is happening. You’ll find 50 booths with over 100 entrepreneurs – none older than 14 years old – plying their wares. I interviewed...

If you stop by Arizona Center (400 E Van Buren St) this Saturday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., right away you’ll notice...

If you stop by Arizona Center (400 E Van Buren St) this Saturday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., right away you’ll notice that something unusual is happening. You’ll find 50 booths with over 100 entrepreneurs – none older than 14 years old – plying their wares. I interviewed event organizer Scott Donnell about the Arizona Children’s Business Fair and what it means for the future of our city. FP: Why should kids care about entrepreneurship? And why should we care that kids care about it? SD: Entrepreneurship is the lifeblood of the marketplace, and it can be the most freeing...

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Q Commons Returns to Phoenix..

February 12, 2015 No Comments 11

Last fall, Q Commons came to Phoenix, and in the weeks leading up to it, I interviewed Steven Siwek, the host of the event. Now, Q Commons is returning to town on February 26 at Redemption Alhambra, so I followed up with Steven on the first event and asked him what we can expect from the next one. FP: What positive developments have come from the Q Commons event you hosted last fall? SS: After our inaugural Q Commons we underestimated how much people really wanted to carry on the conversation. It was inspiring to see how much people care about our city and it seems everyone that attended the last Q Commons was looking for a way to engage themselves in the future flourishing of the greater Phoenix metro area. One of the good things that came from our first meeting together was introducing people to other like-minded individuals. I can't even begin to measure how those synergies contributed to newfound relationships or inspired new ideas. As great as that initial gathering was, I think at this Q Commons we are much better prepared to either get people engaged in exciting initiatives or encourage them to continue pursuing the common good through the relationships they'll undoubtedly make. For example, we have established a Facebook page specifically for Phoenix that we will be posting to consistently with thought provoking articles and local opportunities. We've also invited speakers that will have very specific take-home points that our audience can engage in immediately following the event. I'm hoping to see the friendships continue to flourish, while also getting our audience to practically engage in helpful projects throughout our city. Q Commons Email Header FP: Tell us about the speakers you've invited to present at the upcoming event. What were you looking...

Last fall, Q Commons came to Phoenix, and in the weeks leading up to it, I interviewed Steven Siwek, the host of the event. Now, Q Commons is returning to town on February 26 at Redemption Alhambra, so I followed up with Steven on the first event and asked him what we can expect from the next one. FP: What positive developments have come from the Q Commons event you hosted last fall? SS: After our inaugural Q Commons we underestimated how much people really wanted to carry on the conversation. It was inspiring to see how much people care about our city and it seems everyone that attended the last Q Commons was looking for a way to engage themselves in the future flourishing of the greater Phoenix metro area. One of the good things that came from our first meeting together was introducing people to other like-minded individuals. I can't even begin to measure how those synergies contributed to newfound relationships or inspired new ideas. As great as that initial gathering was, I think at this Q Commons we are much better prepared to either get people engaged in exciting initiatives or encourage them to continue pursuing the common good through the...

Last fall, Q Commons came to Phoenix, and in the weeks leading up to it, I interviewed Steven Siwek, the host of the event. Now, Q Commons is returning to town on February 26 at Redemption Alhambra, so I followed up with Steven on the first event and asked him what we can expect from the next one. FP: What positive developments have come from the Q Commons event you hosted last fall? SS: After our inaugural Q Commons we underestimated how much people really wanted to carry on the conversation. It was inspiring to see how much people care about our city...

Last fall, Q Commons came to Phoenix, and in the weeks leading up to it, I interviewed Steven Siwek, the host of the event. Now, Q Commons is returning to town on February 26 at Redemption Alhambra, so I followed up with Steven on the first event and asked him...

Last fall, Q Commons came to Phoenix, and in the weeks leading up to it, I interviewed Steven Siwek, the host of the event. Now,...

Last fall, Q Commons came to Phoenix, and in the weeks leading up to it, I interviewed Steven Siwek, the host of the event. Now, Q Commons is returning to town on February 26 at Redemption Alhambra, so I followed up with Steven on the first event and asked him what we can expect from the next one. FP: What positive developments have come from the Q Commons event you hosted last fall? SS: After our inaugural Q Commons we underestimated how much people really wanted to carry on the conversation. It was inspiring to see how much people care about our city...

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The Scarlet Cord..

January 21, 2015 1 Comment 9

For five days beginning next Wednesday, downtown Phoenix will play host to an expected one million visitors, all anxious to be part of the unparalleled hype that surrounds the Super Bowl each year wherever it is played. There will be live music, great food, national sports broadcasts, and even a giant climbing wall reminiscent of the Grand Canyon. Those who wander a few blocks north towards Roosevelt Row will find something else that may seem out of place: a 40-foot storage container with people streaming in and out. Inside the container they will find The Scarlet Cord, an award-winning exhibit by artist Pamela Alderman. The exhibit, which opens January 23 and runs through February 1, will be open from 10am to 9pm each day and admission will be free. The Scarlet Cord is presented by StreetLightUSA, a Phoenix-based nonprofit specializing in providing care for child victims of sex trafficking and exploitation. Our editor Tim Hoiland spoke with Alderman about The Scarlet Cord and about the power of art to heal personal and social wounds. FP: The concept behind The Scarlet Cord is a unique one. Tell us a bit about it. PA: It’s about healing for sex-trafficked children and it’s in a storage container. The idea is that children who are victims of sex-trafficking are manipulated, forced, coerced into the industry. They’re tethered. A red cord twists throughout the container, with 30 weathered doors representing broken children. The cord represents the way children are tethered, physically or psychologically. They’re tied to the past and they’re tied to their handler. A lot of us think this doesn’t happen here. We know it’s in places like Bangkok, Thailand. But it’s harder to understand and accept that it is here too. But it is, and it’s modern day slavery. It’s uncomfortable, entering this secret world, but this is the...

For five days beginning next Wednesday, downtown Phoenix will play host to an expected one million visitors, all anxious to be part of the unparalleled hype that surrounds the Super Bowl each year wherever it is played. There will be live music, great food, national sports broadcasts, and even a giant climbing wall reminiscent of the Grand Canyon. Those who wander a few blocks north towards Roosevelt Row will find something else that may seem out of place: a 40-foot storage container with people streaming in and out. Inside the container they will find The Scarlet Cord, an award-winning exhibit by artist Pamela Alderman. The exhibit, which opens January 23 and runs through February 1, will be open from 10am to 9pm each day and admission will be free. The Scarlet Cord is presented by StreetLightUSA, a Phoenix-based nonprofit specializing in providing care for child victims of sex trafficking and exploitation. Our editor Tim Hoiland spoke with Alderman about The Scarlet Cord and about the power of art to heal personal and social wounds. FP: The concept behind The Scarlet Cord is a unique one. Tell us a bit about it. PA: It’s about healing for sex-trafficked children and it’s in a storage container. The...

For five days beginning next Wednesday, downtown Phoenix will play host to an expected one million visitors, all anxious to be part of the unparalleled hype that surrounds the Super Bowl each year wherever it is played. There will be live music, great food, national sports broadcasts, and even a giant climbing wall reminiscent of the Grand Canyon. Those who wander a few blocks north towards Roosevelt Row will find something else that may seem out of place: a 40-foot storage container with people streaming in and out. Inside the container they will find The Scarlet Cord, an award-winning exhibit by artist...

For five days beginning next Wednesday, downtown Phoenix will play host to an expected one million visitors, all anxious to be part of the unparalleled hype that surrounds the Super Bowl each year wherever it is played. There will be live music, great food, national sports broadcasts, and even a...

For five days beginning next Wednesday, downtown Phoenix will play host to an expected one million visitors, all anxious to be part of the unparalleled...

For five days beginning next Wednesday, downtown Phoenix will play host to an expected one million visitors, all anxious to be part of the unparalleled hype that surrounds the Super Bowl each year wherever it is played. There will be live music, great food, national sports broadcasts, and even a giant climbing wall reminiscent of the Grand Canyon. Those who wander a few blocks north towards Roosevelt Row will find something else that may seem out of place: a 40-foot storage container with people streaming in and out. Inside the container they will find The Scarlet Cord, an award-winning exhibit by artist...

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Celebrating Unsung Heroes..

December 31, 2014 No Comments 7

To many, Phoenix is known for its sprawling suburbs—and that reputation has seldom been seen as a good thing. But metro areas are changing, in many ways for the better, and ours is no exception. But while we rightly celebrate the revitalization of urban cores like downtown Phoenix—signified by hip cafés, luxury condos, award-winning restaurants, and the like—it would be a mistake to overlook how the suburbs are changing as well. Earlier this year, we linked to a Politico magazine story about the suburbanization of poverty in metro Atlanta, which invited the haunting question: “What happens when poverty spreads to a place that wasn’t built for poor people?” It’s a question that anyone who cares about human flourishing simply has to reckon with. I was reminded of this question while reading a new essay published by The Economist, which considers, among other metro areas, the changing face of the less-than-glamorous Phoenix suburbs: America’s suburbs are not withering, but many of them have changed, in ways that can seem disturbing. Recent events have made Ferguson a distressing example. It is a suburb that has become mostly black but which retains a mostly white power structure, parts of which strike its black residents as oppressive. Still, other suburbs have adapted more easily. Among them is Levittown in New Jersey, studied by the sociologist Herbert Gans in 1958. When it was built, blacks were banned from living there. It is now known as Willingboro Township and is three-quarters black. One of the biggest, oldest and poorest suburban developments in America is Maryvale, in Phoenix. It was built at great speed in the 1950s and sold just as quickly. But many of its white inhabitants fled in the 1980s following a strange cluster of leukaemia cases. Maryvale is now home to around 200,000 people, roughly three-quarters of whom are Hispanic....

To many, Phoenix is known for its sprawling suburbs—and that reputation has seldom been seen as a good thing. But metro areas are changing, in many ways for the better, and ours is no exception. But while we rightly celebrate the revitalization of urban cores like downtown Phoenix—signified by hip cafés, luxury condos, award-winning restaurants, and the like—it would be a mistake to overlook how the suburbs are changing as well. Earlier this year, we linked to a Politico magazine story about the suburbanization of poverty in metro Atlanta, which invited the haunting question: “What happens when poverty spreads to a place that wasn’t built for poor people?” It’s a question that anyone who cares about human flourishing simply has to reckon with. I was reminded of this question while reading a new essay published by The Economist, which considers, among other metro areas, the changing face of the less-than-glamorous Phoenix suburbs: America’s suburbs are not withering, but many of them have changed, in ways that can seem disturbing. Recent events have made Ferguson a distressing example. It is a suburb that has become mostly black but which retains a mostly white power structure, parts of which strike its black residents as oppressive. Still, other...

To many, Phoenix is known for its sprawling suburbs—and that reputation has seldom been seen as a good thing. But metro areas are changing, in many ways for the better, and ours is no exception. But while we rightly celebrate the revitalization of urban cores like downtown Phoenix—signified by hip cafés, luxury condos, award-winning restaurants, and the like—it would be a mistake to overlook how the suburbs are changing as well. Earlier this year, we linked to a Politico magazine story about the suburbanization of poverty in metro Atlanta, which invited the haunting question: “What happens when poverty spreads to a place that wasn’t...

To many, Phoenix is known for its sprawling suburbs—and that reputation has seldom been seen as a good thing. But metro areas are changing, in many ways for the better, and ours is no exception. But while we rightly celebrate the revitalization of urban cores like downtown Phoenix—signified by hip cafés, luxury condos,...

To many, Phoenix is known for its sprawling suburbs—and that reputation has seldom been seen as a good thing. But metro areas are changing, in many ways for...

To many, Phoenix is known for its sprawling suburbs—and that reputation has seldom been seen as a good thing. But metro areas are changing, in many ways for the better, and ours is no exception. But while we rightly celebrate the revitalization of urban cores like downtown Phoenix—signified by hip cafés, luxury condos, award-winning restaurants, and the like—it would be a mistake to overlook how the suburbs are changing as well. Earlier this year, we linked to a Politico magazine story about the suburbanization of poverty in metro Atlanta, which invited the haunting question: “What happens when poverty spreads to a place that wasn’t...

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