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For the Health of the Young

November 23, 2015 No Comments 1

Cover Arizona, a coalition of over 900 community and statewide organizations, is holding a series of informational events to encourage all Arizonans to enroll in the health insurance marketplace, which opened November 1. The group’s goal is to get the entire state insured. Cover Arizona and its members have been holding events to educate the public, especially “hard-to-reach” populations, on health care rights and options, said David Aguirre, chair of communications. He said these populations include minorities, the LGBT community, and young adults, especially college students. “[Young adults] feel like they’re young, strong, and they’re not going to get sick, so therefore they don’t need health insurance,” said Aguirre. “It’s a little hard to get them to really focus on getting health insurance because they are healthy.” The group sets up tables at locations targeting these populations, including Phoenix College recently, in hopes of getting people interested in enrolling in the marketplace. It will continue to hold events until the open enrollment period ends on January 31. Diane Brown, executive director of Cover Arizona member Arizona Public Interest Research Group, said that through tabling, social media, and class announcements, thousands of Phoenix College students and members of the community will know how to enroll in a health insurance plan by the end of the week. Gary Maloy - GCC Student Talking with Enrollment Assister “Young adults have historically been the most uninsured Arizonans,” said Brown. “The Arizona PIRG Education Fund has been working with community colleges across the state to help young adults know their health insurance options and rights.” She said the group is trying to raise the number of insured young adults by providing literature on rights and plan options, as well as a checklist of documents needed for an individual to enroll, such as a social...

Cover Arizona, a coalition of over 900 community and statewide organizations, is holding a series of informational events to encourage all Arizonans to enroll in the health insurance marketplace, which opened November 1. The group’s goal is to get the entire state insured. Cover Arizona and its members have been holding events to educate the public, especially “hard-to-reach” populations, on health care rights and options, said David Aguirre, chair of communications. He said these populations include minorities, the LGBT community, and young adults, especially college students. “[Young adults] feel like they’re young, strong, and they’re not going to get sick, so therefore they don’t need health insurance,” said Aguirre. “It’s a little hard to get them to really focus on getting health insurance because they are healthy.” The group sets up tables at locations targeting these populations, including Phoenix College recently, in hopes of getting people interested in enrolling in the marketplace. It will continue to hold events until the open enrollment period ends on January 31. Diane Brown, executive director of Cover Arizona member Arizona Public Interest Research Group, said that through tabling, social media, and class announcements, thousands of Phoenix College students and members of the community will know how to enroll...

Cover Arizona, a coalition of over 900 community and statewide organizations, is holding a series of informational events to encourage all Arizonans to enroll in the health insurance marketplace, which opened November 1. The group’s goal is to get the entire state insured. Cover Arizona and its members have been holding events to educate the public, especially “hard-to-reach” populations, on health care rights and options, said David Aguirre, chair of communications. He said these populations include minorities, the LGBT community, and young adults, especially college students. “[Young adults] feel like they’re young, strong, and they’re not going to get sick, so therefore...

Cover Arizona, a coalition of over 900 community and statewide organizations, is holding a series of informational events to encourage all Arizonans to enroll in the health insurance marketplace, which opened November 1. The group’s goal is to get the entire state insured. Cover Arizona and its members have been holding...

Cover Arizona, a coalition of over 900 community and statewide organizations, is holding a series of informational events to encourage all Arizonans to enroll in...

Cover Arizona, a coalition of over 900 community and statewide organizations, is holding a series of informational events to encourage all Arizonans to enroll in the health insurance marketplace, which opened November 1. The group’s goal is to get the entire state insured. Cover Arizona and its members have been holding events to educate the public, especially “hard-to-reach” populations, on health care rights and options, said David Aguirre, chair of communications. He said these populations include minorities, the LGBT community, and young adults, especially college students. “[Young adults] feel like they’re young, strong, and they’re not going to get sick, so therefore...

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Restoring Our Obligation to Protect the Weak

November 18, 2015 No Comments 3

A 2010 study published by the Treatment Advocacy Center and the National Sheriffs' Association found that in the United States, those with severe mental illnesses are "three times more likely to be in jail or prison than in a psychiatric hospital" and that "40 percent of individuals with serious mental illnesses have been in jail or prison at some time in their lives." This heightened risk of incarceration is just one of the indicators that those with serious mental illnesses are among the most vulnerable members of our communities. Tremendous isolation is also a routine experience for the mentally ill, who are often more regarded as projects to be solved than as people with inherent dignity and worth. "If societies are judged by how they treat their most disabled members," says Dr. E. Fuller Torrey, a research psychiatrist who contributed to the study, "our society will be judged harshly indeed." Deborah Geesling, the president of P82 Project Restoration, has decided to do something about it. Based in the East Valley, the organization has set out to build a home where those who suffer from serious mental illness can receive the support and personalized treatment they need over the long term in a context of dignity and care. Here is our recent interview. Flourish Phoenix: I know that mental health has become a personal issue for you, not some abstract cause. Could you tell us what led you to start P82 Project Restoration? Deborah Geesling: My husband and I have four sons. Our third son has a very serious mental illness. Our entire family has been impacted as we watched this unyielding brain disease develop and the ensuing suffering our son has endured. He also lacks insight into his illness, a condition known as anosognosia, which makes it even more difficult to obtain the appropriate treatment, care, and support. Through advocating for our son for...

A 2010 study published by the Treatment Advocacy Center and the National Sheriffs' Association found that in the United States, those with severe mental illnesses are "three times more likely to be in jail or prison than in a psychiatric hospital" and that "40 percent of individuals with serious mental illnesses have been in jail or prison at some time in their lives." This heightened risk of incarceration is just one of the indicators that those with serious mental illnesses are among the most vulnerable members of our communities. Tremendous isolation is also a routine experience for the mentally ill, who are often more regarded as projects to be solved than as people with inherent dignity and worth. "If societies are judged by how they treat their most disabled members," says Dr. E. Fuller Torrey, a research psychiatrist who contributed to the study, "our society will be judged harshly indeed." Deborah Geesling, the president of P82 Project Restoration, has decided to do something about it. Based in the East Valley, the organization has set out to build a home where those who suffer from serious mental illness can receive the support and personalized treatment they need over the long term in a context of dignity and care. Here is our recent...

A 2010 study published by the Treatment Advocacy Center and the National Sheriffs' Association found that in the United States, those with severe mental illnesses are "three times more likely to be in jail or prison than in a psychiatric hospital" and that "40 percent of individuals with serious mental illnesses have been in jail or prison at some time in their lives." This heightened risk of incarceration is just one of the indicators that those with serious mental illnesses are among the most vulnerable members of our communities. Tremendous isolation is also a routine experience for the mentally ill, who are often more regarded as...

A 2010 study published by the Treatment Advocacy Center and the National Sheriffs' Association found that in the United States, those with severe mental illnesses are "three times more likely to be in jail or prison than in a psychiatric hospital" and that "40 percent of individuals with serious mental illnesses have been...

A 2010 study published by the Treatment Advocacy Center and the National Sheriffs' Association found that in the United States, those with severe mental illnesses are "three times...

A 2010 study published by the Treatment Advocacy Center and the National Sheriffs' Association found that in the United States, those with severe mental illnesses are "three times more likely to be in jail or prison than in a psychiatric hospital" and that "40 percent of individuals with serious mental illnesses have been in jail or prison at some time in their lives." This heightened risk of incarceration is just one of the indicators that those with serious mental illnesses are among the most vulnerable members of our communities. Tremendous isolation is also a routine experience for the mentally ill, who are often more regarded as...

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The Scarlet Cord – An Update

September 24, 2015 No Comments 1

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the reactions of people as they experienced the exhibit. A short film about the installation opened last week at the Grand Rapids Public Museum in Michigan, as reported by mlive.com. You can learn more about Pamela Alderman and "The Scarlet Cord" here. The trailer for the film is...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the reactions of people as they experienced the exhibit. A short film about the installation opened last week at the Grand Rapids Public Museum in Michigan, as reported by mlive.com. You can learn more about Pamela Alderman and "The Scarlet Cord" here. The trailer for the film is...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the reactions of people as they experienced the exhibit. A short film about the installation opened last week at the Grand Rapids Public Museum in Michigan, as reported by mlive.com. You can learn more about Pamela Alderman and "The Scarlet Cord" here. The trailer for the film is...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord."...

Many of you will remember that earlier this year we published an in-depth interview with Pamela Alderman, the award-winning artist behind the installation "The Scarlet Cord." The exhibit was in Phoenix during the Super Bowl festivities downtown, and was sponsored by StreetlightUSA. A film crew was on hand during that time, filming the reactions of people as they experienced the exhibit. A short film about the installation opened last week at the Grand Rapids Public Museum in Michigan, as reported by mlive.com. You can learn more about Pamela Alderman and "The Scarlet Cord" here. The trailer for the film is...

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Community Transformation in Guadalupe

August 11, 2015 No Comments 2

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with Marina Gonzales, a local leader in Guadalupe who runs the Guadalupe Learning Lab at El Mercado de Guadalupe. The learning lab's fall program begins this week. Flourish Phoenix: How do you see the work of the Guadalupe Learning Lab becoming more and more community owned? Marina Gonzales: When we started, parents would just drop off their kids. Sometimes, not even that. If they saw my car in the parking lot they knew I was here so they’d just drop them off outside and the kids would run in. Now, the parents walk their kids in here. They stop and talk for a little bit. We recently had an end-of-the-summer party and all the parents were here, cooking food, bringing snacks. They want to be here to see what their kids have been doing. Some of the parents are also helping to transport the kids when we have field trips, and they’re paying for them to go. And they’re willing to do it. When they come with us to places like Skateland or the museum, they don’t just drop us off – they stay the whole time. All of this means they’re interacting a lot more with our program. guadalupelab1 FP: What do you think is the biggest way this work is benefiting Guadalupe? MG: The biggest thing is helping our kids get through school, getting them the education they need. When they get older they’ll need that education. Without it, they’re going to have a hard life. Less than half...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with Marina Gonzales, a local leader in Guadalupe who runs the Guadalupe Learning Lab at El Mercado de Guadalupe. The learning lab's fall program begins this week. Flourish Phoenix: How do you see the work of the Guadalupe Learning Lab becoming more and more community owned? Marina Gonzales: When we started, parents would just drop off their kids. Sometimes, not even that. If they saw my car in the parking lot they knew I was here so they’d just drop them off outside and the kids would run in. Now, the parents walk their kids in here. They stop and talk for a little bit. We recently had an end-of-the-summer party and all the parents were here, cooking food, bringing snacks. They want to be here to see what their kids have been doing. Some of the parents are also helping to transport the kids when we have field trips, and they’re paying for...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with Marina Gonzales, a local leader in Guadalupe who runs the Guadalupe Learning Lab at El Mercado de Guadalupe. The learning lab's fall program begins this week. Flourish Phoenix: How do you see the work of the Guadalupe Learning Lab becoming more and more community owned? Marina Gonzales: When we started, parents would...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We...

A year or so ago we published an interview with Jeff Bisgrove of Arizona Neighborhood Transformation, focused on community development work underway in Guadalupe. We thought it would be a good time to check in again and see what’s happened in the meantime. Our editor Tim Hoiland sat down down with Marina Gonzales, a local leader in Guadalupe who runs the Guadalupe Learning Lab at El Mercado de Guadalupe. The learning lab's fall program begins this week. Flourish Phoenix: How do you see the work of the Guadalupe Learning Lab becoming more and more community owned? Marina Gonzales: When we started, parents would...

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Discovering Treasures 4 Teachers

July 20, 2015 No Comments 3

My discovery started with a friend’s Facebook post. She was offering her empty coffee canister to anyone who wanted it. Laden with my own collection of containers, I read through responses interested to find a solution for my own unable-to-recycle infant formula cans. One response caught my attention: Treasures 4 Teachers. Curious, I sought out more information about the organization. The more I learned, the more I wanted to get involved. I wanted to talk with the founder, see the store, and tell others about it. Treasures 4 Teachers was founded by Barbara Blalock, an energetic and tenacious woman. It had been her dream to start an organization similar to the Resource Area for Teaching when she moved to Arizona and found the educational system without much-needed supplies. She started collecting items in her garage to distribute to classrooms she worked with but after a six-month battle with valley fever she found herself without a job. After much contemplation, Barbara decided to take the advice of her husband and finally make her dream a reality. In 2005, she started Treasures 4 Teachers. Treasures(13of27) Treasures 4 Teachers is a store that provides school supplies to teachers at little or no cost. The store overflows with donations from various businesses and individuals throughout metro Phoenix. At first glance, the store seems to be a collection of unwanted goods – bags full of plastic beans, stacks of dull containers, bins full of scrap canvases, and an additional 12,000 square feet of similar trinkets. It is obvious what the organization wants to do, but how does all this stuff work in the classroom? With Barbara’s insight, the items magically transform from plastic beans to a rain stick, from dull containers to cubby boxes, from scrap canvases to painted murals. “Many...

My discovery started with a friend’s Facebook post. She was offering her empty coffee canister to anyone who wanted it. Laden with my own collection of containers, I read through responses interested to find a solution for my own unable-to-recycle infant formula cans. One response caught my attention: Treasures 4 Teachers. Curious, I sought out more information about the organization. The more I learned, the more I wanted to get involved. I wanted to talk with the founder, see the store, and tell others about it. Treasures 4 Teachers was founded by Barbara Blalock, an energetic and tenacious woman. It had been her dream to start an organization similar to the Resource Area for Teaching when she moved to Arizona and found the educational system without much-needed supplies. She started collecting items in her garage to distribute to classrooms she worked with but after a six-month battle with valley fever she found herself without a job. After much contemplation, Barbara decided to take the advice of her husband and finally make her dream a reality. In 2005, she started Treasures 4 Teachers. Treasures(13of27) Treasures 4 Teachers is a store that provides school supplies to teachers...

My discovery started with a friend’s Facebook post. She was offering her empty coffee canister to anyone who wanted it. Laden with my own collection of containers, I read through responses interested to find a solution for my own unable-to-recycle infant formula cans. One response caught my attention: Treasures 4 Teachers. Curious, I sought out more information about the organization. The more I learned, the more I wanted to get involved. I wanted to talk with the founder, see the store, and tell others about it. Treasures 4 Teachers was founded by Barbara Blalock, an energetic and tenacious woman. It had...

My discovery started with a friend’s Facebook post. She was offering her empty coffee canister to anyone who wanted it. Laden with my own collection of containers, I read through responses interested to find a solution for my own unable-to-recycle infant formula cans. One response caught my attention: Treasures 4...

My discovery started with a friend’s Facebook post. She was offering her empty coffee canister to anyone who wanted it. Laden with my own collection...

My discovery started with a friend’s Facebook post. She was offering her empty coffee canister to anyone who wanted it. Laden with my own collection of containers, I read through responses interested to find a solution for my own unable-to-recycle infant formula cans. One response caught my attention: Treasures 4 Teachers. Curious, I sought out more information about the organization. The more I learned, the more I wanted to get involved. I wanted to talk with the founder, see the store, and tell others about it. Treasures 4 Teachers was founded by Barbara Blalock, an energetic and tenacious woman. It had...

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A Strange June

June 25, 2015 No Comments 3

Complaints of the cruel summer to come have certainly come. And come hard. We’re now more than ankle deep in those triple digit temperatures we've come to know and love. But I remember an easier time. A time when the mornings and evenings were still bearable. A time when the Earth loved us a little more. A time... like, two weeks ago. Way back when I was considering which movies would keep me cool during the summer months, whether they be new documentaries at FilmBar or old classics to check out from the library. Ohh, those were the days. But it has been a strange June. Hasn't it? Below normal temperatures during the first part of the month and above normal temperatures during the latter. Well, that all just balances everything out so very comfortably, doesn’t it? Ha! So I will hearken back to the first part of the month... A time when the lack of natural light made it seem more like Seattle than the Sonoran Desert, leaving a few glorious, scattered sun-drenched rainstorms. A record rainfall on June 5! OK, the ONLY rainfall recorded on that day. Ever. So what if it wasn’t even two-tenths of an inch. But still, hey, maybe that would be a sign of unseasonably cool temps to come! Maybe it will be a mild one! Maybe this summer won't be so bad! Ha! haldiman-3 So by a week into June, I knew I'd better hedge my bets and enjoy our fine city it while I could, before the major league temps started setting in. Bring on the bike riding! Me and my mind on two wheels along canals and sidewalks, middle class and under middle class, strip clubs and strip malls. Ohh say, 12th Street between Camelback and Osborn roads. haldiman-2 Now, that's one area...

Complaints of the cruel summer to come have certainly come. And come hard. We’re now more than ankle deep in those triple digit temperatures we've come to know and love. But I remember an easier time. A time when the mornings and evenings were still bearable. A time when the Earth loved us a little more. A time... like, two weeks ago. Way back when I was considering which movies would keep me cool during the summer months, whether they be new documentaries at FilmBar or old classics to check out from the library. Ohh, those were the days. But it has been a strange June. Hasn't it? Below normal temperatures during the first part of the month and above normal temperatures during the latter. Well, that all just balances everything out so very comfortably, doesn’t it? Ha! So I will hearken back to the first part of the month... A time when the lack of natural light made it seem more like Seattle than the Sonoran Desert, leaving a few glorious, scattered sun-drenched rainstorms. A record rainfall on June 5! OK, the ONLY rainfall recorded on that day. Ever. So what if it wasn’t even two-tenths of an inch. But still, hey, maybe that would be a sign of...

Complaints of the cruel summer to come have certainly come. And come hard. We’re now more than ankle deep in those triple digit temperatures we've come to know and love. But I remember an easier time. A time when the mornings and evenings were still bearable. A time when the Earth loved us a little more. A time... like, two weeks ago. Way back when I was considering which movies would keep me cool during the summer months, whether they be new documentaries at FilmBar or old classics to check out from the library. Ohh, those were the days. But it has been a strange June....

Complaints of the cruel summer to come have certainly come. And come hard. We’re now more than ankle deep in those triple digit temperatures we've come to know and love. But I remember an easier time. A time when the mornings and evenings were still bearable. A time when the Earth loved us a...

Complaints of the cruel summer to come have certainly come. And come hard. We’re now more than ankle deep in those triple digit temperatures we've come to...

Complaints of the cruel summer to come have certainly come. And come hard. We’re now more than ankle deep in those triple digit temperatures we've come to know and love. But I remember an easier time. A time when the mornings and evenings were still bearable. A time when the Earth loved us a little more. A time... like, two weeks ago. Way back when I was considering which movies would keep me cool during the summer months, whether they be new documentaries at FilmBar or old classics to check out from the library. Ohh, those were the days. But it has been a strange June....

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Loving Phoenix

June 10, 2015 No Comments 6

When I first arrived in Phoenix a decade ago this summer to interview for a job at the Arizona Republic, I ate lunch at the Hooters in Arizona Center. It’s one thing to want to eat at Hooters. It’s another thing to have to eat at Hooters because there are so few dining options. While I was slightly annoyed by downtown Phoenix’s then sparse options, I was very excited about the job for which I was being considered – and what I thought it meant for my long-term journalism career. I have long been passionate about higher education and its potential to expose enrolled students to ideas, individuals, and worlds beyond anything they had ever considered. So when Republic editors let me know that they wanted to interview me to be the Arizona State University reporter, I jumped at the opportunity. Arizona was the second fastest growing state in the country. And Arizona State University was on its way to being the country’s largest residential university. By the time I arrived, President Michael Crow had been on the ground for three years following a stint as provost of the Ivy League Columbia University. And he was – for better or worse – hell-bent on transforming ASU from a school mainly known for partying to a highly respected academic institution comparable to some of the country’s best public universities. And I wanted to tell the story – but only for two years. As grateful as I was to have a high profile beat at the Republic – the largest daily paper owned by Gannett, the largest newspaper publisher in the country – at 24, I was full of East Coast arrogance. I was raised in Washington, D.C. and studied journalism at a “public ivy” and was hoping to be at the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times or...

When I first arrived in Phoenix a decade ago this summer to interview for a job at the Arizona Republic, I ate lunch at the Hooters in Arizona Center. It’s one thing to want to eat at Hooters. It’s another thing to have to eat at Hooters because there are so few dining options. While I was slightly annoyed by downtown Phoenix’s then sparse options, I was very excited about the job for which I was being considered – and what I thought it meant for my long-term journalism career. I have long been passionate about higher education and its potential to expose enrolled students to ideas, individuals, and worlds beyond anything they had ever considered. So when Republic editors let me know that they wanted to interview me to be the Arizona State University reporter, I jumped at the opportunity. Arizona was the second fastest growing state in the country. And Arizona State University was on its way to being the country’s largest residential university. By the time I arrived, President Michael Crow had been on the ground for three years following a stint as provost of the Ivy League Columbia University. And he was – for better or worse – hell-bent on transforming...

When I first arrived in Phoenix a decade ago this summer to interview for a job at the Arizona Republic, I ate lunch at the Hooters in Arizona Center. It’s one thing to want to eat at Hooters. It’s another thing to have to eat at Hooters because there are so few dining options. While I was slightly annoyed by downtown Phoenix’s then sparse options, I was very excited about the job for which I was being considered – and what I thought it meant for my long-term journalism career. I have long been passionate about higher education and its potential to expose...

When I first arrived in Phoenix a decade ago this summer to interview for a job at the Arizona Republic, I ate lunch at the Hooters in Arizona Center. It’s one thing to want to eat at Hooters. It’s another thing to have to eat at Hooters because there are so...

When I first arrived in Phoenix a decade ago this summer to interview for a job at the Arizona Republic, I ate lunch at the...

When I first arrived in Phoenix a decade ago this summer to interview for a job at the Arizona Republic, I ate lunch at the Hooters in Arizona Center. It’s one thing to want to eat at Hooters. It’s another thing to have to eat at Hooters because there are so few dining options. While I was slightly annoyed by downtown Phoenix’s then sparse options, I was very excited about the job for which I was being considered – and what I thought it meant for my long-term journalism career. I have long been passionate about higher education and its potential to expose...

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Praying for Reconciliation and Peace

May 6, 2015 No Comments 3

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response, members of the clergy here in metro Phoenix have organized prayer rallies calling for racial justice and reconciliation through Faith & Justice PHX. At Flourish Phoenix, we’ve published multiple pieces by thoughtful leaders who are grappling with the implications of racial injustices, and we're committed to publishing additional perspectives on the issue (we’re waiting to hear from you!). In the meantime, we want you to know about the first annual Law Enforcement Prayer Breakfast coming up on May 20. Pastor José González, who leads a local network of Latino pastors, is organizing this event, with proceeds going to the 100 Club of Arizona. Gov. Doug Ducey is scheduled to speak, along with Attorney General Mark Brnovich and Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery. We spoke with Pastor González about his hopes for the event and his views on the need for reconciliation in our community. FP: In addition to your work as a hospice chaplain, you lead Arizona Christian Link. Could you briefly tell us what that is? JG: Arizona Christian Link is an organization that is helping to connect Latino churches with Anglo churches and African American churches, but also with government agencies and other institutions in our community. FP: In light of the recent tensions between police officers and minority communities, how do you see this event as a step towards reconciliation in our own city? JG: I believe there is a tendency to show the bad side of law enforcement officers. When we see one bad cop, it makes us believe that all cops are the same....

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response, members of the clergy here in metro Phoenix have organized prayer rallies calling for racial justice and reconciliation through Faith & Justice PHX. At Flourish Phoenix, we’ve published multiple pieces by thoughtful leaders who are grappling with the implications of racial injustices, and we're committed to publishing additional perspectives on the issue (we’re waiting to hear from you!). In the meantime, we want you to know about the first annual Law Enforcement Prayer Breakfast coming up on May 20. Pastor José González, who leads a local network of Latino pastors, is organizing this event, with proceeds going to the 100 Club of Arizona. Gov. Doug Ducey is scheduled to speak, along with Attorney General Mark Brnovich and Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery. We spoke with Pastor González about his hopes for the event and his views on the need for reconciliation in our community. FP: In addition to your work as a hospice chaplain, you lead...

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response, members of the clergy here in metro Phoenix have organized prayer rallies calling for racial justice and reconciliation through Faith & Justice PHX. At Flourish Phoenix, we’ve published multiple pieces by thoughtful leaders who are grappling with the implications of racial injustices, and we're committed to publishing additional perspectives on the...

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response,...

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities...

It is no secret that for many years there has been, to varying degrees, suspicion and even antagonism between law enforcement officials and minority communities in our country. Over the past year we’ve seen these tensions reach tipping points in Ferguson, in New York, and most recently, in Baltimore. In response, members of the clergy here in metro Phoenix have organized prayer rallies calling for racial justice and reconciliation through Faith & Justice PHX. At Flourish Phoenix, we’ve published multiple pieces by thoughtful leaders who are grappling with the implications of racial injustices, and we're committed to publishing additional perspectives on the...

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Both/And

April 22, 2015 No Comments 10

All of the excitement surrounding the explosion of development in and around the downtown Phoenix corridor has brought with it what seems to be a never ending battle: entrepreneurial vs. corporate; local vs. chain; “the little guy” vs. “the man.” And the debate rages on. Yet, perhaps the debate is unnecessary. Is it possible to be both corporate and entrepreneurial – or even more of a leap, chain restaurant and local establishment? And, is it conceivable that “the man” has much in common with “the little guy”? In January 2010, along with my wife and three kids I moved to the Willo Historic District to start a new church in the city’s center. We had no idea what a gem we had “discovered” because we were largely ignorant to the beauty and community that urban Phoenix offered. Like many east valley residents, we didn’t even know an urban Phoenix existed. But when we decided to start a new church we knew we didn’t want to start it in the suburbs – the land of the chain restaurant! We had always felt called to the city, where people from all walks of life meet in a beautiful collision. Where $500 a month apartments share an alley with million dollar homes. When we moved downtown, we were not disappointed. We found many people like ourselves and many people very different. We met many who were seeking a more walkable, bikeable, almost “small town” experience in the midst of urban development. Others were seeking a place to live for the evening or just to grab something to eat. Soon after we arrived in the city, we began to see the covert signs of what has now become obvious. Urban Phoenix was not going to be an oxymoron for long. New cafes, restaurants, bike paths, parks, and galleries...

All of the excitement surrounding the explosion of development in and around the downtown Phoenix corridor has brought with it what seems to be a never ending battle: entrepreneurial vs. corporate; local vs. chain; “the little guy” vs. “the man.” And the debate rages on. Yet, perhaps the debate is unnecessary. Is it possible to be both corporate and entrepreneurial – or even more of a leap, chain restaurant and local establishment? And, is it conceivable that “the man” has much in common with “the little guy”? In January 2010, along with my wife and three kids I moved to the Willo Historic District to start a new church in the city’s center. We had no idea what a gem we had “discovered” because we were largely ignorant to the beauty and community that urban Phoenix offered. Like many east valley residents, we didn’t even know an urban Phoenix existed. But when we decided to start a new church we knew we didn’t want to start it in the suburbs – the land of the chain restaurant! We had always felt called to the city, where people from all walks of life meet in a beautiful collision. Where $500 a month apartments...

All of the excitement surrounding the explosion of development in and around the downtown Phoenix corridor has brought with it what seems to be a never ending battle: entrepreneurial vs. corporate; local vs. chain; “the little guy” vs. “the man.” And the debate rages on. Yet, perhaps the debate is unnecessary. Is it possible to be both corporate and entrepreneurial – or even more of a leap, chain restaurant and local establishment? And, is it conceivable that “the man” has much in common with “the little guy”? In January 2010, along with my wife and three kids I moved to the Willo...

All of the excitement surrounding the explosion of development in and around the downtown Phoenix corridor has brought with it what seems to be a never ending battle: entrepreneurial vs. corporate; local vs. chain; “the little guy” vs. “the man.” And the debate rages on. Yet, perhaps the debate is unnecessary....

All of the excitement surrounding the explosion of development in and around the downtown Phoenix corridor has brought with it what seems to be a...

All of the excitement surrounding the explosion of development in and around the downtown Phoenix corridor has brought with it what seems to be a never ending battle: entrepreneurial vs. corporate; local vs. chain; “the little guy” vs. “the man.” And the debate rages on. Yet, perhaps the debate is unnecessary. Is it possible to be both corporate and entrepreneurial – or even more of a leap, chain restaurant and local establishment? And, is it conceivable that “the man” has much in common with “the little guy”? In January 2010, along with my wife and three kids I moved to the Willo...

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The Pinewood Classic

April 18, 2015 No Comments 4

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the Flourish Phoenix logo. He does great work.) FP: Where in the world did the idea for this event come from? DP: A few years back I took a trip back to my hometown of Virginia Beach. Around the same time, my dad was building a pinewood derby car with my younger brother. We had done the same thing years before when I was a boy scout, but this time it was a lot different. Dad proceeded to show me the precision machined wheels he’d purchased off the “cub scout black market,” and right down to the millimeter where to place his aftermarket tungsten weights. He had a laundry list of NASA-certified methods, guaranteed to win the pinewood derby. And he did. He and my brother went to state finals several years running. When I was younger, the full extent was, “I want mine to look like a steam engine!” And that was that. No bells, no whistles. It made me want to build a pinewood derby car more than ever. I just needed a reason. pinewood4 I had been part of planning Pedal Craft’s second and third events here in Phoenix, and knew just enough about throwing this type of party to be dangerous. During the last Pedal Craft event at Monorchid, I blurted out my idea to Brad Moore of Short Leash Hot Dogs. Before I had finished my sentence he offered to host it at their restaurant. Brad and Kat have really championed The Pinewood...

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the Flourish Phoenix logo. He does great work.) FP: Where in the world did the idea for this event come from? DP: A few years back I took a trip back to my hometown of Virginia Beach. Around the same time, my dad was building a pinewood derby car with my younger brother. We had done the same thing years before when I was a boy scout, but this time it was a lot different. Dad proceeded to show me the precision machined wheels he’d purchased off the “cub scout black market,” and right down to the millimeter where to place his aftermarket tungsten weights. He had a laundry list of NASA-certified methods, guaranteed to win the pinewood derby. And he did. He and my brother went to state finals several years running. When I was younger, the full extent was, “I want mine to look like a steam engine!” And that was...

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the Flourish Phoenix logo. He does great work.) FP: Where in the world did the idea for this event come from? DP: A few years back I took a trip back to my hometown of Virginia Beach. Around the same time, my dad was building a pinewood derby car with my younger brother....

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the...

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are...

The Pinewood Classic returns to downtown Phoenix for the second time on Saturday, April 25. Though slots for racers sold out a while ago, spectators are in for a real treat with food, drink, and people-watching galore. We asked Doug Penick to tell us about the event. (Full disclosure: Doug is the mastermind behind the Flourish Phoenix logo. He does great work.) FP: Where in the world did the idea for this event come from? DP: A few years back I took a trip back to my hometown of Virginia Beach. Around the same time, my dad was building a pinewood derby car with my younger brother....

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