Blog

Specificity

July 15, 2014 No Comments 1

"They can print statistics and count the populations in hundreds of thousands, but to each man a city consists of no more than a few streets, a few houses, a few people. Remove those few and a city exists no longer except as a pain in the memory, like a pain of an amputated leg no longer there." ― Graham Greene, Our Man in...

"They can print statistics and count the populations in hundreds of thousands, but to each man a city consists of no more than a few streets, a few houses, a few people. Remove those few and a city exists no longer except as a pain in the memory, like a pain of an amputated leg no longer there." ― Graham Greene, Our Man in...

"They can print statistics and count the populations in hundreds of thousands, but to each man a city consists of no more than a few streets, a few houses, a few people. Remove those few and a city exists no longer except as a pain in the memory, like a pain of an amputated leg no longer there." ― Graham Greene, Our Man in...

"They can print statistics and count the populations in hundreds of thousands, but to each man a city consists of no more than a few streets, a few houses, a few people. Remove those few and a city exists no longer except as a pain in the memory, like a...

"They can print statistics and count the populations in hundreds of thousands, but to each man a city consists of no more than a few...

"They can print statistics and count the populations in hundreds of thousands, but to each man a city consists of no more than a few streets, a few houses, a few people. Remove those few and a city exists no longer except as a pain in the memory, like a pain of an amputated leg no longer there." ― Graham Greene, Our Man in...

Read More

Why Environmental Stewardship Matters

July 14, 2014 3 Comments 4

It was my first time at church. Ever. My parents must have felt guilty about something, because they had the sudden urge to attend church one hot summer day in 1992. It was one of the few times I remember visiting a Sunday school class as a child. I found myself feeling awkward as a 10-year old who didn’t understand most of the words and didn't know any of the people. The activity for our class was to write out a prayer on a decorative piece of paper. Not knowing much about prayer, I had to draw on the limited areas of knowledge I had as a child of the early 90s: the Gulf War, science class, baseball, and girls. Here was my prayer: “Dear God, Thank you for food, water, shelter, space, love, and a wonderful world. Please kill Saddam Hussein. Please let me marry Jill from my baseball team. Amen.” I’m fully aware that this is a creepy prayer for a ten-year-old. The teachers were rightly concerned, but about the wrong things. When I explained that my line about food, water, shelter, and space came from my science class and that these things made up the different parts of an animal’s habitat, they responded by telling me that I needed to make my prayer “more spiritual.” They didn’t comment on my hawkish foreign policy. That incident stuck with me. Years later, when I came to know and love Christ, I assumed that when I started to read the Bible, I would read a spiritual book that was ambivalent toward this physical world. I didn’t expect to find a verse that said, “Thou shall not recycle, but thou shall drown baby seals in in a puddle of motor oil.”  Rather, I expected to find a message about a God that cared exclusively about spiritual...

It was my first time at church. Ever. My parents must have felt guilty about something, because they had the sudden urge to attend church one hot summer day in 1992. It was one of the few times I remember visiting a Sunday school class as a child. I found myself feeling awkward as a 10-year old who didn’t understand most of the words and didn't know any of the people. The activity for our class was to write out a prayer on a decorative piece of paper. Not knowing much about prayer, I had to draw on the limited areas of knowledge I had as a child of the early 90s: the Gulf War, science class, baseball, and girls. Here was my prayer: “Dear God, Thank you for food, water, shelter, space, love, and a wonderful world. Please kill Saddam Hussein. Please let me marry Jill from my baseball team. Amen.” I’m fully aware that this is a creepy prayer for a ten-year-old. The teachers were rightly concerned, but about the wrong things. When I explained that my line about food, water, shelter, and space came from my science class and that these things made up the different parts of an animal’s habitat,...

It was my first time at church. Ever. My parents must have felt guilty about something, because they had the sudden urge to attend church one hot summer day in 1992. It was one of the few times I remember visiting a Sunday school class as a child. I found myself feeling awkward as a 10-year old who didn’t understand most of the words and didn't know any of the people. The activity for our class was to write out a prayer on a decorative piece of paper. Not knowing much about prayer, I had to draw on the limited areas of...

It was my first time at church. Ever. My parents must have felt guilty about something, because they had the sudden urge to attend church one hot summer day in 1992. It was one of the few times I remember visiting a Sunday school class as a child. I found myself...

It was my first time at church. Ever. My parents must have felt guilty about something, because they had the sudden urge to attend church one...

It was my first time at church. Ever. My parents must have felt guilty about something, because they had the sudden urge to attend church one hot summer day in 1992. It was one of the few times I remember visiting a Sunday school class as a child. I found myself feeling awkward as a 10-year old who didn’t understand most of the words and didn't know any of the people. The activity for our class was to write out a prayer on a decorative piece of paper. Not knowing much about prayer, I had to draw on the limited areas of...

Read More

Reversing Sprawl

July 11, 2014 No Comments 0

The headline for a recent Fast Company article proclaims, “Phoenix Is Pulling Off An Urban Miracle”—the miracle being, by this account, the transformation of Phoenix into a walkable city. The article highlights a series of before-and-after mock-ups produced by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company (DPZ) featuring “narrower roads, bike lanes, sidewalk cafes, and new parks replacing vast swaths of concrete.” The proposed plans are focused on walkable urban development along the light rail, ultimately aimed at reducing Valley residents’ dependence on cars. As Galina Tachieva of DPZ is quoted as saying, “The city that will survive in the 21st century is a city which relies on simpler methods of mobility and transportation than just cars." Go check out the renderings and read the article at Fast Company for yourself. Then come on back and share your thoughts in the comments. As someone who lives here, what do you make of this so-called “urban...

The headline for a recent Fast Company article proclaims, “Phoenix Is Pulling Off An Urban Miracle”—the miracle being, by this account, the transformation of Phoenix into a walkable city. The article highlights a series of before-and-after mock-ups produced by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company (DPZ) featuring “narrower roads, bike lanes, sidewalk cafes, and new parks replacing vast swaths of concrete.” The proposed plans are focused on walkable urban development along the light rail, ultimately aimed at reducing Valley residents’ dependence on cars. As Galina Tachieva of DPZ is quoted as saying, “The city that will survive in the 21st century is a city which relies on simpler methods of mobility and transportation than just cars." Go check out the renderings and read the article at Fast Company for yourself. Then come on back and share your thoughts in the comments. As someone who lives here, what do you make of this so-called “urban...

The headline for a recent Fast Company article proclaims, “Phoenix Is Pulling Off An Urban Miracle”—the miracle being, by this account, the transformation of Phoenix into a walkable city. The article highlights a series of before-and-after mock-ups produced by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company (DPZ) featuring “narrower roads, bike lanes, sidewalk cafes, and new parks replacing vast swaths of concrete.” The proposed plans are focused on walkable urban development along the light rail, ultimately aimed at reducing Valley residents’ dependence on cars. As Galina Tachieva of DPZ is quoted as saying, “The city that will survive in the 21st century is a...

The headline for a recent Fast Company article proclaims, “Phoenix Is Pulling Off An Urban Miracle”—the miracle being, by this account, the transformation of Phoenix into a walkable city. The article highlights a series of before-and-after mock-ups produced by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company (DPZ) featuring “narrower roads, bike lanes, sidewalk...

The headline for a recent Fast Company article proclaims, “Phoenix Is Pulling Off An Urban Miracle”—the miracle being, by this account, the transformation of Phoenix...

The headline for a recent Fast Company article proclaims, “Phoenix Is Pulling Off An Urban Miracle”—the miracle being, by this account, the transformation of Phoenix into a walkable city. The article highlights a series of before-and-after mock-ups produced by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company (DPZ) featuring “narrower roads, bike lanes, sidewalk cafes, and new parks replacing vast swaths of concrete.” The proposed plans are focused on walkable urban development along the light rail, ultimately aimed at reducing Valley residents’ dependence on cars. As Galina Tachieva of DPZ is quoted as saying, “The city that will survive in the 21st century is a...

Read More

When Poverty Sprawls into the Suburbs

July 11, 2014 No Comments 0

Rebecca Burns has an important article in Politico Magazine on the suburbanization of poverty. While her focus is on trends in the Atlanta metro area, there are plenty of insights for us here in Phoenix as well. Burns describes how Cobb County has morphed over the past 15 years from “a quintessentially middle-class kind of place” to a suburb where the poverty rate has doubled, earning it the dubious distinction of being the United States county “where low-income people have the least chance of finding affordable places to live.” This is not an indictment of Cobb County in particular. Rather, what’s happening in Cobb is a microcosm of the dilemma facing suburbs nationwide: a rapid spike in the number of poor people in what once were the sprawling beacons of American prosperity. Think of it as the flip side of the national urban boom: The poverty rate across all U.S. suburbs doubled in the first decade of the millennium—even as America’s cities are transforming in the other direction, toward rising affluence and hipster reinvention. If the old story of poverty in America was crumbling inner cities and drug-addled housing projects, the new story is increasingly one of downscale strip malls and long bus rides in search of ever-scarcer jobs. We can’t understand what’s working in America’s cities unless we also look at what’s not working in the vast suburbs that surround them. Last summer, Ronald Hansen of the Arizona Republic reported on the rise of suburban poverty in metro Phoenix. “Since 2000,” he wrote, “suburban poverty in metro Phoenix has soared, creating new pockets of decay and surprising hurdles in areas often inexperienced with such problems.” Hansen referred to research from the recent book Confronting Suburban Poverty in America, based on the findings of a study by the Brookings Institution, which found that suburban...

Rebecca Burns has an important article in Politico Magazine on the suburbanization of poverty. While her focus is on trends in the Atlanta metro area, there are plenty of insights for us here in Phoenix as well. Burns describes how Cobb County has morphed over the past 15 years from “a quintessentially middle-class kind of place” to a suburb where the poverty rate has doubled, earning it the dubious distinction of being the United States county “where low-income people have the least chance of finding affordable places to live.” This is not an indictment of Cobb County in particular. Rather, what’s happening in Cobb is a microcosm of the dilemma facing suburbs nationwide: a rapid spike in the number of poor people in what once were the sprawling beacons of American prosperity. Think of it as the flip side of the national urban boom: The poverty rate across all U.S. suburbs doubled in the first decade of the millennium—even as America’s cities are transforming in the other direction, toward rising affluence and hipster reinvention. If the old story of poverty in America was crumbling inner cities and drug-addled housing projects, the new story is increasingly one of downscale strip malls and long...

Rebecca Burns has an important article in Politico Magazine on the suburbanization of poverty. While her focus is on trends in the Atlanta metro area, there are plenty of insights for us here in Phoenix as well. Burns describes how Cobb County has morphed over the past 15 years from “a quintessentially middle-class kind of place” to a suburb where the poverty rate has doubled, earning it the dubious distinction of being the United States county “where low-income people have the least chance of finding affordable places to live.” This is not an indictment of Cobb County in particular. Rather, what’s happening...

Rebecca Burns has an important article in Politico Magazine on the suburbanization of poverty. While her focus is on trends in the Atlanta metro area, there are plenty of insights for us here in Phoenix as well. Burns describes how Cobb County has morphed over the past 15 years from “a...

Rebecca Burns has an important article in Politico Magazine on the suburbanization of poverty. While her focus is on trends in the Atlanta metro area,...

Rebecca Burns has an important article in Politico Magazine on the suburbanization of poverty. While her focus is on trends in the Atlanta metro area, there are plenty of insights for us here in Phoenix as well. Burns describes how Cobb County has morphed over the past 15 years from “a quintessentially middle-class kind of place” to a suburb where the poverty rate has doubled, earning it the dubious distinction of being the United States county “where low-income people have the least chance of finding affordable places to live.” This is not an indictment of Cobb County in particular. Rather, what’s happening...

Read More

The End of Chronic Homelessness

July 11, 2014 No Comments 0

In January, Mayor Greg Stanton shared his Year in Review, summarizing major accomplishments in the city during 2013. Perhaps most notable was the December news that Phoenix had become the first city to end chronic homelessness among veterans: When Stanton took office, he pledged to unite the city to tackle homelessness – and today, Phoenix is the first U.S. city to end chronic homelessness among veterans. The feat wasn’t easy – and it took a wide coalition of non-profit organizations, faith-based groups, business leaders and government agencies. But those who wore our nation’s uniform – who spent an average of eight years living on the streets – now have a more secure and stable life with access to the resources they need to stay healthy. Phoenix’s work to honor our veterans doesn’t stop at housing – the city is leading the way to help veterans who need a job find one. For more than a year, Stanton has worked with businesses and community partners to find jobs for unemployed veterans through the Hire, Educate, Recruit and Organize (H.E.R.O.) Initiative. H.E.R.O. is much more than a job fair – it’s a comprehensive event that prepares veterans as they transition to civilian work, matches them with ideal employers, and helps with applications and interview skills. Ensuring that Phoenix’s veterans are employed isn’t just the right thing to do – it also strengthens our economy. At Flourish Phoenix, we want to celebrate what has been accomplished through the collaboration of a range of institutions and service providers to end chronic homelessness among veterans. We also want to deal honestly with the fact that an estimated xx men, women, and children remain homeless in Phoenix and throughout the Valley, and consider what it might take to end chronic homelessness for all. If you or someone you know has...

In January, Mayor Greg Stanton shared his Year in Review, summarizing major accomplishments in the city during 2013. Perhaps most notable was the December news that Phoenix had become the first city to end chronic homelessness among veterans: When Stanton took office, he pledged to unite the city to tackle homelessness – and today, Phoenix is the first U.S. city to end chronic homelessness among veterans. The feat wasn’t easy – and it took a wide coalition of non-profit organizations, faith-based groups, business leaders and government agencies. But those who wore our nation’s uniform – who spent an average of eight years living on the streets – now have a more secure and stable life with access to the resources they need to stay healthy. Phoenix’s work to honor our veterans doesn’t stop at housing – the city is leading the way to help veterans who need a job find one. For more than a year, Stanton has worked with businesses and community partners to find jobs for unemployed veterans through the Hire, Educate, Recruit and Organize (H.E.R.O.) Initiative. H.E.R.O. is much more than a job fair – it’s a comprehensive event that prepares veterans as they transition to civilian work, matches...

In January, Mayor Greg Stanton shared his Year in Review, summarizing major accomplishments in the city during 2013. Perhaps most notable was the December news that Phoenix had become the first city to end chronic homelessness among veterans: When Stanton took office, he pledged to unite the city to tackle homelessness – and today, Phoenix is the first U.S. city to end chronic homelessness among veterans. The feat wasn’t easy – and it took a wide coalition of non-profit organizations, faith-based groups, business leaders and government agencies. But those who wore our nation’s uniform – who spent an average of eight...

In January, Mayor Greg Stanton shared his Year in Review, summarizing major accomplishments in the city during 2013. Perhaps most notable was the December news that Phoenix had become the first city to end chronic homelessness among veterans: When Stanton took office, he pledged to unite the city to tackle homelessness...

In January, Mayor Greg Stanton shared his Year in Review, summarizing major accomplishments in the city during 2013. Perhaps most notable was the December news...

In January, Mayor Greg Stanton shared his Year in Review, summarizing major accomplishments in the city during 2013. Perhaps most notable was the December news that Phoenix had become the first city to end chronic homelessness among veterans: When Stanton took office, he pledged to unite the city to tackle homelessness – and today, Phoenix is the first U.S. city to end chronic homelessness among veterans. The feat wasn’t easy – and it took a wide coalition of non-profit organizations, faith-based groups, business leaders and government agencies. But those who wore our nation’s uniform – who spent an average of eight...

Read More

A Story of Comebacks

July 10, 2014 No Comments 1

Mario Polèse, author of The Wealth and Poverty of Regions: Why Cities...

Mario Polèse, author of The Wealth and Poverty of Regions: Why Cities...

Mario Polèse, author of The Wealth and Poverty of Regions: Why Cities...

Mario Polèse, author of The Wealth and Poverty of Regions: Why Cities...

Mario Polèse, author of The Wealth and Poverty of Regions: Why Cities...

Mario Polèse, author of The Wealth and Poverty of Regions: Why Cities...

Read More

Staying Put

July 9, 2014 No Comments 1

As some of you may know, Phoenix is considered one of the most transient cities in the country. This pattern of constant comings and goings inevitably gives shape to our neighborhoods, businesses, schools, and churches, for better or worse. On the one hand, transient cities benefit from new ideas and ventures. At the same time, relationships often suffer as a result, and loyalties can run thin. For many years Timothy Keller, the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York, has been making a theological case for Christians to move into cities and to stay there. Though many Christians have tended to view cities as havens of moral evil and social ills, he argues that our impulse shouldn’t simply be to flee to “greener pastures.” In his short e-book Why God Made Cities (available for free here), Keller reflects on the well-known words of the biblical prophet Jeremiah to the Israelites who were living as exiles in Babylon. Keller writes: What does he say to them? He says, “Identify with the prosperity of that city.” He does not say, “Go into the streets and preach to the city. Hand out tracts in the city. Then, get out.” He says, “Settle down. Build houses. Have children. Identify with the city. Identify with the people of the city, with the well-being of the city. Weave yourselves into the city in a way that weaves wholeness and health into the city. He continues: If you are in a city or a community that is broken, where people are burned out or spiritually lost, where there is violence—stay as long as you can. Identify as much as you can. You have to work this out with your conscience, but Jeremiah 29 says don’t just have loving feelings. Don’t just preach. Identify. Serve. Pray for the peace of the city. At Flourish...

As some of you may know, Phoenix is considered one of the most transient cities in the country. This pattern of constant comings and goings inevitably gives shape to our neighborhoods, businesses, schools, and churches, for better or worse. On the one hand, transient cities benefit from new ideas and ventures. At the same time, relationships often suffer as a result, and loyalties can run thin. For many years Timothy Keller, the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York, has been making a theological case for Christians to move into cities and to stay there. Though many Christians have tended to view cities as havens of moral evil and social ills, he argues that our impulse shouldn’t simply be to flee to “greener pastures.” In his short e-book Why God Made Cities (available for free here), Keller reflects on the well-known words of the biblical prophet Jeremiah to the Israelites who were living as exiles in Babylon. Keller writes: What does he say to them? He says, “Identify with the prosperity of that city.” He does not say, “Go into the streets and preach to the city. Hand out tracts in the city. Then, get out.” He says, “Settle down. Build houses. Have...

As some of you may know, Phoenix is considered one of the most transient cities in the country. This pattern of constant comings and goings inevitably gives shape to our neighborhoods, businesses, schools, and churches, for better or worse. On the one hand, transient cities benefit from new ideas and ventures. At the same time, relationships often suffer as a result, and loyalties can run thin. For many years Timothy Keller, the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York, has been making a theological case for Christians to move into cities and to stay there. Though many Christians have tended...

As some of you may know, Phoenix is considered one of the most transient cities in the country. This pattern of constant comings and goings inevitably gives shape to our neighborhoods, businesses, schools, and churches, for better or worse. On the one hand, transient cities benefit from new ideas and ventures....

As some of you may know, Phoenix is considered one of the most transient cities in the country. This pattern of constant comings and goings inevitably...

As some of you may know, Phoenix is considered one of the most transient cities in the country. This pattern of constant comings and goings inevitably gives shape to our neighborhoods, businesses, schools, and churches, for better or worse. On the one hand, transient cities benefit from new ideas and ventures. At the same time, relationships often suffer as a result, and loyalties can run thin. For many years Timothy Keller, the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York, has been making a theological case for Christians to move into cities and to stay there. Though many Christians have tended...

Read More

Making Old Things New

July 8, 2014 No Comments 0

Amy Wang of the Arizona Republic and azcentral.com writes about adaptive-reuse projects throughout Phoenix: Drive the streets of downtown and central Phoenix and you may do several double takes: What appears to be a church is actually a taco restaurant. A former pie factory now houses numerous small businesses. And upon closer inspection, an old brick pool house is a walk-up coffee bar. Phoenix established its adaptive reuse program in 2008 to help streamline the process of renovating existing buildings for new business uses. Since then, more than 100 successful adaptive-reuse projects have sprung up across the city. There are some restrictions: A former schoolhouse couldn't be renovated to become, say, an adults-only book store. However, officials say by and large the program has inspired creative transformations and helped preserve Phoenix's history, one structure at a time. You can read the rest of the article and check out a related photo essay of before and after pictures...

Amy Wang of the Arizona Republic and azcentral.com writes about adaptive-reuse projects throughout Phoenix: Drive the streets of downtown and central Phoenix and you may do several double takes: What appears to be a church is actually a taco restaurant. A former pie factory now houses numerous small businesses. And upon closer inspection, an old brick pool house is a walk-up coffee bar. Phoenix established its adaptive reuse program in 2008 to help streamline the process of renovating existing buildings for new business uses. Since then, more than 100 successful adaptive-reuse projects have sprung up across the city. There are some restrictions: A former schoolhouse couldn't be renovated to become, say, an adults-only book store. However, officials say by and large the program has inspired creative transformations and helped preserve Phoenix's history, one structure at a time. You can read the rest of the article and check out a related photo essay of before and after pictures...

Amy Wang of the Arizona Republic and azcentral.com writes about adaptive-reuse projects throughout Phoenix: Drive the streets of downtown and central Phoenix and you may do several double takes: What appears to be a church is actually a taco restaurant. A former pie factory now houses numerous small businesses. And upon closer inspection, an old brick pool house is a walk-up coffee bar. Phoenix established its adaptive reuse program in 2008 to help streamline the process of renovating existing buildings for new business uses. Since then, more than 100 successful adaptive-reuse projects have sprung up across the city. There are some restrictions: A former...

Amy Wang of the Arizona Republic and azcentral.com writes about adaptive-reuse projects throughout Phoenix: Drive the streets of downtown and central Phoenix and you may do several double takes: What appears to be a church is actually a taco restaurant. A former pie factory now houses numerous small businesses. And upon...

Amy Wang of the Arizona Republic and azcentral.com writes about adaptive-reuse projects throughout Phoenix: Drive the streets of downtown and central Phoenix and you may do...

Amy Wang of the Arizona Republic and azcentral.com writes about adaptive-reuse projects throughout Phoenix: Drive the streets of downtown and central Phoenix and you may do several double takes: What appears to be a church is actually a taco restaurant. A former pie factory now houses numerous small businesses. And upon closer inspection, an old brick pool house is a walk-up coffee bar. Phoenix established its adaptive reuse program in 2008 to help streamline the process of renovating existing buildings for new business uses. Since then, more than 100 successful adaptive-reuse projects have sprung up across the city. There are some restrictions: A former...

Read More
img04









Connecting the Dots

July 7, 2014 No Comments 2

In biological terms, symbiosis is “the living together of two dissimilar organisms” in a mutual, parasitical, or some other kind of relationship. In psychiatry, it signifies “a relationship between two people in which each person is dependent upon and receives reinforcement, whether beneficial or detrimental, from the other.” More generally, symbiosis can be defined as “any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.” At Flourish Phoenix, we believe in engaging our city symbiotically. That is, we want to explore its interconnectedness. We want to pay attention to cause and effect, to this and to that. Why? Because we believe the flourishing of our city and our communities requires that we connect the dots. Over at The Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture’s Common Place blog, Josh Yates asks, “What does it mean and take for a community and its residents to thrive?” This question—which he admits is a “morally and ethically freighted” one—lies at the heart of The Thriving Cities Project, a research initiative at the University of Virginia that aims to assess and define community thriving. One of the framing concepts behind the project is that in any community, a multitude of seemingly unrelated factors are working together at the same time: Take any one of the many problems that today beset our cities: it does not take intimate familiarity or expertise to determine that they cannot be understood, let alone addressed, in isolation from any number of other concerns or from the broader communal and institutional contexts in which they are situated. Whether one is concerned about crime, childhood obesity, economic development, environmental degradation, or affordable housing, it almost goes without saying that a host of external factors and forces shape them in consequential ways. This is obviously true—for better or for worse—and at Flourish Phoenix, we take this principle seriously....

In biological terms, symbiosis is “the living together of two dissimilar organisms” in a mutual, parasitical, or some other kind of relationship. In psychiatry, it signifies “a relationship between two people in which each person is dependent upon and receives reinforcement, whether beneficial or detrimental, from the other.” More generally, symbiosis can be defined as “any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.” At Flourish Phoenix, we believe in engaging our city symbiotically. That is, we want to explore its interconnectedness. We want to pay attention to cause and effect, to this and to that. Why? Because we believe the flourishing of our city and our communities requires that we connect the dots. Over at The Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture’s Common Place blog, Josh Yates asks, “What does it mean and take for a community and its residents to thrive?” This question—which he admits is a “morally and ethically freighted” one—lies at the heart of The Thriving Cities Project, a research initiative at the University of Virginia that aims to assess and define community thriving. One of the framing concepts behind the project is that in any community, a multitude of seemingly unrelated factors are working together at the...

In biological terms, symbiosis is “the living together of two dissimilar organisms” in a mutual, parasitical, or some other kind of relationship. In psychiatry, it signifies “a relationship between two people in which each person is dependent upon and receives reinforcement, whether beneficial or detrimental, from the other.” More generally, symbiosis can be defined as “any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.” At Flourish Phoenix, we believe in engaging our city symbiotically. That is, we want to explore its interconnectedness. We want to pay attention to cause and effect, to this and to that. Why? Because we believe...

In biological terms, symbiosis is “the living together of two dissimilar organisms” in a mutual, parasitical, or some other kind of relationship. In psychiatry, it signifies “a relationship between two people in which each person is dependent upon and receives reinforcement, whether beneficial or detrimental, from the other.” More generally, symbiosis...

In biological terms, symbiosis is “the living together of two dissimilar organisms” in a mutual, parasitical, or some other kind of relationship. In psychiatry, it signifies...

In biological terms, symbiosis is “the living together of two dissimilar organisms” in a mutual, parasitical, or some other kind of relationship. In psychiatry, it signifies “a relationship between two people in which each person is dependent upon and receives reinforcement, whether beneficial or detrimental, from the other.” More generally, symbiosis can be defined as “any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.” At Flourish Phoenix, we believe in engaging our city symbiotically. That is, we want to explore its interconnectedness. We want to pay attention to cause and effect, to this and to that. Why? Because we believe...

Read More