Features
Collaborating, Not Competing
July 21, 2014 0 12

The loneliness and isolation that mark modern Western life are amplified in a place like Phoenix. By far the largest city in the second-fastest-growing state, with 4.2 million, Phoenix has wittingly or unwittingly taken on a spirit of more, bigger and—possibly most significantly—farther. It's the opposite of a place like New York City, where tight quarters lead to creative use of compact areas. The vast horizons in the Valley of the Sun are breathtaking. But the sheer possibility offered by all of the land can lead to fragmented lives, long car rides, and moving farther and farther out. Enter Jade Meskill, a Phoenix entrepreneur who's built his company around fighting such isolation with a vengeance. His strategy is simple: he values human beings. And his values have driven him to make ample space—literally—for community and collaboration. This wasn't always the case. In his first job as Chief Technology Officer for a distribution company in...

The loneliness and isolation that mark modern Western life are amplified in a place like Phoenix. By far the largest city in the second-fastest-growing state, with 4.2 million, Phoenix has wittingly or unwittingly taken on a spirit of more, bigger and—possibly most significantly—farther. It's the opposite of a place like New...

The loneliness and isolation that mark modern Western life are amplified in a place like Phoenix. By far the largest city in the second-fastest-growing state, with 4.2 million, Phoenix has wittingly or unwittingly taken on a spirit of more, bigger and—possibly...

The loneliness and isolation that mark modern Western life are amplified in a place like Phoenix. By far the largest city in the second-fastest-growing state, with...

The loneliness and isolation that mark modern Western life are amplified in a place like Phoenix. By far the largest city in the second-fastest-growing state, with 4.2 million, Phoenix has wittingly or unwittingly taken on a...

The loneliness and isolation that mark modern Western life are amplified in a place like Phoenix. By far the largest city in the second-fastest-growing state, with 4.2 million, Phoenix has wittingly or unwittingly taken on a...

The loneliness and isolation that mark modern Western life are amplified in a place like Phoenix. By far the largest city in the second-fastest-growing state, with 4.2 million, Phoenix has wittingly or unwittingly taken on a spirit of more, bigger and—possibly most significantly—farther. It's the opposite of a place like New York City, where tight quarters lead to creative use of compact areas. The vast horizons in the Valley of the Sun are breathtaking. But the sheer possibility offered by all of the land can lead to fragmented lives, long car rides, and moving farther and farther out. Enter Jade Meskill, a Phoenix...

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My Refugee Neighbors
July 10, 2014 0 10

I’ll never forget last summer when an old man came to my front door in the blazing heat of the desert, face sweating and hands shaking. He desperately asked if he could pull our weeds for some money, and I cold-heartedly sent him away and shut the door. It was because his presence made me too uncomfortable and I just wanted him out of my sight. That was a sin, I believe, and I am forgiven even though it still hurts. I know I’m not the only one who struggles with the volume of need in our world and what I can actually do about it. My friend Geeta, who works with Reconciled World in India, reminded me last week that every follower of Jesus is held accountable for his or her own corner—we are not responsible for the whole world. What freedom! At the same time, “every little bit counts …...

I’ll never forget last summer when an old man came to my front door in the blazing heat of the desert, face sweating and hands shaking. He desperately asked if he could pull our weeds for some money, and I cold-heartedly sent him away and shut the door. It was because...

I’ll never forget last summer when an old man came to my front door in the blazing heat of the desert, face sweating and hands shaking. He desperately asked if he could pull our weeds for some money, and I cold-heartedly...

I’ll never forget last summer when an old man came to my front door in the blazing heat of the desert, face sweating and hands...

I’ll never forget last summer when an old man came to my front door in the blazing heat of the desert, face sweating and hands shaking. He desperately asked if he could pull our weeds for...

I’ll never forget last summer when an old man came to my front door in the blazing heat of the desert, face sweating and hands shaking. He desperately asked if he could pull our weeds for...

I’ll never forget last summer when an old man came to my front door in the blazing heat of the desert, face sweating and hands shaking. He desperately asked if he could pull our weeds for some money, and I cold-heartedly sent him away and shut the door. It was because his presence made me too uncomfortable and I just wanted him out of my sight. That was a sin, I believe, and I am forgiven even though it still hurts. I know I’m not the only one who struggles with the volume of need in our world and what I can...

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The Entrepreneurial Craft
July 3, 2014 0 14

Baseball was Aaron Klusman's first career. A Phoenix native, he played while attending Brophy, a private Jesuit school downtown, then became an All-American pitcher at Arizona State University (ASU) before signing as a top prospect with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2004. But sports is an especially front-loaded career, and when injuries began sidelining him, Klusman was forced to face the reality of life without baseball. "I had fully planned on being the best baseball player in the world," he says. "Then I started asking: If I don't have baseball, who am I?" Some of Klusman's ASU teammates were Christians, and through involvement with the campus chapter of Fellowship of Christian Athletes during his freshman year, Klusman began reading the Bible for himself. "God was working on a lot of different fronts, opening my eyes to the truth of who he is," Klusman says. "Life suddenly had color, and I discovered a...

Baseball was Aaron Klusman's first career. A Phoenix native, he played while attending Brophy, a private Jesuit school downtown, then became an All-American pitcher at Arizona State University (ASU) before signing as a top prospect with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2004. But sports is an especially front-loaded career, and when...

Baseball was Aaron Klusman's first career. A Phoenix native, he played while attending Brophy, a private Jesuit school downtown, then became an All-American pitcher at Arizona State University (ASU) before signing as a top prospect with the Los Angeles Dodgers...

Baseball was Aaron Klusman's first career. A Phoenix native, he played while attending Brophy, a private Jesuit school downtown, then became an All-American pitcher at...

Baseball was Aaron Klusman's first career. A Phoenix native, he played while attending Brophy, a private Jesuit school downtown, then became an All-American pitcher at Arizona State University (ASU) before signing as a top prospect...

Baseball was Aaron Klusman's first career. A Phoenix native, he played while attending Brophy, a private Jesuit school downtown, then became an All-American pitcher at Arizona State University (ASU) before signing as a top prospect...

Baseball was Aaron Klusman's first career. A Phoenix native, he played while attending Brophy, a private Jesuit school downtown, then became an All-American pitcher at Arizona State University (ASU) before signing as a top prospect with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2004. But sports is an especially front-loaded career, and when injuries began sidelining him, Klusman was forced to face the reality of life without baseball. "I had fully planned on being the best baseball player in the world," he says. "Then I started asking: If I don't have baseball, who am I?" Some of Klusman's ASU teammates were Christians, and through...

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Skate After School
May 27, 2015 0 14

Every Wednesday afternoon the unmistakable sound of skateboards smacking on hard ground and the rowdy yells of elementary school kids filter through gym doors onto the otherwise empty campus of David Crockett Elementary School in Phoenix. The kids are part of an after school program called Skate After School, and they’re...

Every Wednesday afternoon the unmistakable sound of skateboards smacking on hard ground and the rowdy yells of elementary school kids filter through gym doors onto the otherwise empty campus of David Crockett Elementary School in Phoenix. The kids are part of...

Every Wednesday afternoon the unmistakable sound of skateboards smacking on hard ground and the rowdy yells of elementary school kids filter through gym doors onto...

Every Wednesday afternoon the unmistakable sound of skateboards smacking on hard ground and the rowdy yells of elementary school kids filter through gym doors onto the otherwise empty campus of David Crockett Elementary School in...

Every Wednesday afternoon the unmistakable sound of skateboards smacking on hard ground and the rowdy yells of elementary school kids filter through gym doors onto the otherwise empty campus of David Crockett Elementary School in...

Every Wednesday afternoon the unmistakable sound of skateboards smacking on hard ground and the rowdy yells of elementary school kids filter through gym doors onto the otherwise empty campus of David Crockett Elementary School in Phoenix. The kids are part of an after school program called Skate After School, and they’re using their school gym in a way most P.E. teachers have never dreamed. Founded in 2013 by three veteran skateboarders, Skate After School aims to use skateboarding as a way to engage school kids in underserved neighborhoods using a sport that is usually associated with punk teenagers united in angst-ridden rebellion. The...

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